Council commends Chief Bryant

SALEM- Salem City Council took the formal step of approving a resolution commending Police Chief James R. Bryant for his 43 years of service to the city.

“You are the city of Salem,” Mayor Randy Foley said to Bryant after the Oct. 12 council vote was taken to officially adopt the resolution. Normally such resolutions are read aloud, but the reading of the whereases and therefores was postponed until Bryant’s retirement dinner next Thursday, Oct. 23, at the Salem Civic Center.

Retiring Salem Police Chief James R. Bryant is honored at the Oct. 12 Salem City Council meeting with a resolution commending him for his 43 years of service to the City of Salem and the Salem Police Department. With the chief and his wife, Lois Ann, are Council members, from left: Jane Johnson, Bill Hones, Mayor Randy Foley, Vice Mayor John Givens and Lisa Garst. -City of Salem photo
Retiring Salem Police Chief James R. Bryant is honored at the Oct. 12 Salem City Council meeting with a resolution commending him for his 43 years of service to the City of Salem and the Salem Police Department. With the chief and his wife, Lois Ann, are Council members, from left: Jane Johnson, Bill Hones, Mayor Randy Foley, Vice Mayor John Givens and Lisa Garst. -City of Salem photo

Fitting the man, he came to the meeting without accompaniment of other police department personnel and humbly accepted the resolution without remark. He said it was the first time he had been to a council meeting since a resolution of commendation for service in Iraq was passed after the end of Desert Storm in 1991.

Bryant was a member of the Marine Reserve and was called up to active duty at the time. He was a lieutenant in the department at the time.

In other actions at Monday night’s council meeting, Pete Lampman, president of Virginia Amateur Sports, presented council with a plaque in appreciation for the continued support the city gives the VAS for the Commonwealth Games. This year marked the 20th anniversary of the games.

Lampman estimated an economic impact of $3.5 million for the valley in the three-day event. He said of the 9,000 competitors, nearly three-quarters come from outside the valley. And because the majority are under the age of 20, they being with them family members who also shop, eat out, stay in local hotels and spend money in the valley.

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